Beets, arugula and farro salad

This beets, arugula and farro salad is the BOMB! Stress out the water.Roast the pecans on a sauce pan without any oil.In a bowl blend the beet cubes with the farro and argula leaves.Add crumbles of goat cheese on leading along with the roasted pecans.Prepare the dressing by blending extra virgin oil with some lemon zest, salt, pepper,

  • one tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, a few oregano leaves and soya sauce.Take out parts
  • of the salad in bowls, spread the dressing and toss the salad together.This beets, arugula and farro salad is packed with nutrition. Farro is a heart healthy option being truly low in fat and with no cholesterol!
  • Instant Pot Chicken Biryani | My Heart Beets

    Authentic and flavorful chicken biryani ready to eat in an hour? Yes, it’s absolutely possible with an Instant Pot!

    This aromatic and mouthwatering chicken biryani is a family-favorite. In fact, I think I like chicken biryani just as much – possibly more than my butter chicken. That is saying A LOT y’all. But really, what’s not to love about perfectly seasoned chicken + rice in one pot?

    Check out my chicken biryani video here:





    MY LATEST VIDEOS

    I LOVE biryani. I’ve been eating biryani all my life and have tried so many different types of biryani. I have already shared a veggie biryani, egg biryani, shrimp biryani and a lamb/beef biryani on the blog and am so happy to be adding chicken biryani to the list!

    If you are familiar with biryani, then you know it typically takes a very long time to prepare and requires dirtying several dishes. With my recipe + your handy dandy Instant Pot, you can make a one-pot recipe that is just as good as the traditional version and creates less mess! It takes just 10 minutes of prep time and can be ready-to-eat in under an hour.

    This dish is easy enough to make on a weeknight and impressive enough to serve to your guests at a dinner party. So invite me over for dinner, won’t you? 😉

    This flavorful chicken biryani is a family-favorite. Biryani, a well- seasoned meat and rice dish, typically takes a long time to prepare and requires dirtying several dishes but this one-pot recipe is just as good as the traditional version and creates less mess! It takes just 10 minutes of prep time and can be ready-to-eat in under an hour. It’s easy enough to make on a weeknight and impressive enough to serve to your guests at a dinner party.

    Ingredients

    Whole Spices

    Ground Spices

    Instructions

    Notes

    Did you make this recipe?

    Tag @myheartbeets on Instagram and hashtag it #myheartbeets

    If you love my chicken biryani, then be sure to check out my Instant Pot Cookbook: Indian Food Under Pressure for more tasty Indian recipes!

    CSA Box Veggies: How to Cook Beets and Their Greens

    < div class="nc_tweetContainer total_shares total_sharesalt"> 22K Shares

    Hi and welcome to summer season! I don’t understand about you, but I make certain caring it. The start of each new season is always interesting for me as it brings new and fantastic things in the garden and subsequently to the cooking area. Summer produce is always so enjoyable and abundant that it’s a fantastic time to come up with brand-new recipes. Farmers Markets are growing and it’s a best time to support your regional farms by purchasing their produce. One fantastic way to do this is to sign up for a CSA veggie box. We got beets in our latest vegetable box, which is amazing! Lots of individuals do not know quite what to do with beets, but keep reading and I’ll reveal you how to cook beets and their greens.I make certain that a few of you recognize with CSA boxes, however if you aren’t, here’s a brief intro for you. CSA represents Community Supported Agriculture and is a method for farms to get a guaranteed income for the season from the produce that they grow. You pay for a “share” for a set amount of time (generally for a season, however every farm is various) and then you get a box of fruit and vegetables, normally weekly, throughout. They all run a little bit differently, however you generally select up your box somewhere or sometimes they’ll even provide it ideal to your door. Numerous CSA programs also let you include on other types of regional foodstuff like eggs, cheese, bread and sometimes even meat. It’s really cool and you should see if you have one locally!

    Fresh beets and beet greens on a cutting board.

    csa veggie box


    MY LATEST VIDEOS< script postpone type="text/javascript" language="javascript" src="https://live.sekindo.com/live/liveView.php?s=87493&cbuster=%%CACHEBUSTER%%&pubUrl=%%REFERRER_URL_ESC_ESC%%&x=340&y=260&vp_contentFeedId=1nc87egr&subId=5733913b9b47b9d4313df01d" > The finest part about beets is that they are really two vegetables in one, the roots and the greens. If you purchase them at the farmers market or at your regional grocery shop make sure to purchase them with the greens attached. When you get home make certain to wash everything well, cut the root pointers off and send them to garden compost, then cut the greens from the roots. Preheat your oven to 400 ° F.
    < img data-lazyloaded="1" src="information: image/gif; base64, R0lGODdhAQABAPAAAMPDwwAAACwAAAAAAQABAAACAkQBADs =" class="aligncenter wp-image-1596 size-large" title="Roasted beets are a flexible seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in lots of methods. In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, as well as a recipe for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" data-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/put-beets-in-foil-800x536.jpg" alt="put beets in foil" width="800" height="536" data-srcset="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/put-beets-in-foil-800x536.jpg 800w, https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/put-beets-in-foil-400x268.jpg 400w" data-sizes =" (max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" data-jpibfi-post-excerpt ="" data-jpibfi-post-url="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/how-to-cook-beets-and-their-greens/" data-jpibfi-post-title="CSA Box Veggies: How to Cook Beets and Their Greens" data-jpibfi-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/put-beets-in-foil-800x536.jpg" data-pin-description="Roasted beets are a versatile seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in lots of methods. 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In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, along with a dish for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" > < img data-lazyloaded="1" src="information: image/gif; base64, R0lGODdhAQABAPAAAMPDwwAAACwAAAAAAQABAAACAkQBADs =" class="aligncenter wp-image-1594 size-large" title="Roasted beets are a versatile seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in numerous ways. In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, as well as a recipe for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" data-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/pancetta-in-pan-800x728.jpg" alt="pancetta in pan" width="800" height="728" data-srcset="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/pancetta-in-pan-800x728.jpg 800w, https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/pancetta-in-pan-400x364.jpg 400w" data-sizes =" (max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" data-jpibfi-post-excerpt ="" data-jpibfi-post-url="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/how-to-cook-beets-and-their-greens/" data-jpibfi-post-title="CSA Box Veggies: How to Cook Beets and Their Greens" data-jpibfi-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/pancetta-in-pan-800x728.jpg" data-pin-description="Roasted beets are a versatile seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in lots of ways. 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In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, in addition to a dish for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" > < img data-lazyloaded="1" src="information: image/gif; base64, R0lGODdhAQABAPAAAMPDwwAAACwAAAAAAQABAAACAkQBADs =" class="aligncenter wp-image-1598 size-large" title="Roasted beets are a flexible seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in numerous methods. 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In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, as well as a recipe for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" > < img data-lazyloaded="1" src="data: image/gif; base64, R0lGODdhAQABAPAAAMPDwwAAACwAAAAAAQABAAACAkQBADs =" class="aligncenter wp-image-1597 size-large" title="Roasted beets are a versatile seasonal vegetable that you can enjoy in many methods. 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In this post I show you how to prepare and roast beets, along with a dish for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" > < img data-lazyloaded="1" src="data: image/gif; base64, R0lGODdhAQABAPAAAMPDwwAAACwAAAAAAQABAAACAkQBADs =" class="aligncenter wp-image-1595 size-large" title="Roasted beets are a flexible seasonal veggie that you can enjoy in many methods. In this post I reveal you how to prepare and roast beets, along with a recipe for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" data-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/peeling-beets-800x646.jpg" alt="peeling beets" width="800" height="646" data-srcset="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/peeling-beets-800x646.jpg 800w, https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/peeling-beets-400x323.jpg 400w" data-sizes =" (max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" data-jpibfi-post-excerpt ="" data-jpibfi-post-url="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/how-to-cook-beets-and-their-greens/" data-jpibfi-post-title="CSA Box Veggies: How to Prepare Beets and Their Greens" data-jpibfi-src="https://www.growforagecookferment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/peeling-beets-800x646.jpg" data-pin-description="Roasted beets are a flexible seasonal veggie that you can enjoy in many methods. In this post I show you how to prepare and roast beets, in addition to a dish for cooking beet greens! #beets #realfood" > This post will be the very first of many over the coming months showcasing how to cook veggies that you might get in your CSA box or at the farmers market and not understand what to do with. I desire to reveal you how easy and delicious it is to prepare veggies so that you’ll in fact wish to consume them, because that’s the entire point, right? I’ve never ever satisfied a veggie that I didn’t like, but I can be specific on how they are prepared so that they truly shine, and I want to pass that understanding on to you!Please inform me, what veggies do you not understand how to cook and wish to discover more about?

    Eat More Beets To Boost Recovery, Fight Inflammation, Support Liver Detox And Help Lower Blood Pressure

    Regardless of your feelings toward beets, this vegetable is one of the healthiest ways to boost overall health.

    Beets or beetroots, as they are often called, are members of the Chenopodiaceae family, and represent one of the varieties of the Beta vulgaris species. They are often used as a natural coloring agent and added to salads, soups, and pickles.

    Although beets are available throughout the year and can be eaten every day, they are still considered seasonal vegetables.

    They have a versatile flavor, and earthy taste when raw, tart when fermented, and sweet when roasted. They are full of nutrients and are beneficial for our heart and brain health, blood pressure, and athletic performance.

    Beets are rich in vitamin C, folate, manganese, and potassium, and low in calories. They are rich in fiber and water, as well as vitamins A and K.

    Here are some of the health benefits of beets:

    • Being high in fiber, beets help digestion and lower the risk of diabetes, colon cancer, and heart disease
    • The extract of beetroot has been scientifically confirmed to reduce the growth of both breast and prostate cancer cells
    • Beets lower blood pressure, as they contain naturally occurring nitrates which convert to nitric oxide, that dilates and relaxes blood vessels, and thus improves blood flow
    • Beets have potent anti-inflammatory properties due to a pigment they contain, betalain, and thus lowers pain and discomfort due to osteoarthritis
    • Nitric oxide helps to dilate and relax blood vessels and thus boosts blood flow to the brain
    • Betaines in beets detoxify the liver and reverse a fatty liver
    • Beet juice has been found to boost athletic performance due to its high nitric oxide conversion
    • Beet juice has been shown to increase muscle capacity, and help patients diagnosed with heart failure.

    Yet, note that this vegetable is rich in oxalates which can cause accumulation of uric in the body which could lead to gout, as well as bladder and kidney stones. Beets are also abundant in sugar, so diabetics should avoid it.

    When purchasing beets, choose the small to medium-sized beets, firm to touch. Avoid the wrinkled, soft, or shriveled ones.

    If they have leaves, trim them about two inches from the root, and store the leaves in a separate container or storage bag for up to 3-4 days. They are highly nutritious and are rich in iron, B6, copper, fiber, phosphorus, potassium, protein, zinc, magnesium, and manganese.

    Store the beets in the fridge, up to three weeks.

    By adding beets to your diet, you will improve your overall health in various ways.

    Therefore, here are some tasty ways to increase their intake:

    • Beetroot juice: Fresh beetroot juice is the most nutritious option since store-bought juice can be rich in added sugars and may only contain a small amount of beets.
    • Beetroot leaves: You can cook beet greens just like spinach.
    • Beetroot salad: Add grated beets to coleslaw.
    • Beetroot dip: Blend beets with Greek yogurt and you will get a delicious and healthy dip.

    Sources:

    The post Eat More Beets To Boost Recovery, Fight Inflammation, Support Liver Detox And Help Lower Blood Pressure appeared first on Healthy Food House.

    Compound in Beets May Help Slow Alzheimer’s

    Summary: According to researchers, betanin, a compound in beetroot extract, could help inhibit the accumulation of misfolded proteins and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Source: ACS.

    A compound in beets that gives the vegetable its distinctive red color could eventually help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, a process that is associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Scientists say this discovery could lead to the development of drugs that could alleviate some of the long-term effects of the disease, the world’s leading cause of dementia.

    The researchers are presenting their work today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world’s largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday. It features more than 13,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics.

    “Our data suggest that betanin, a compound in beet extract, shows some promise as an inhibitor of certain chemical reactions in the brain that are involved in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Li-June Ming, Ph.D. “This is just a first step, but we hope that our findings will encourage other scientists to look for structures similar to betanin that could be used to synthesize drugs that could make life a bit easier for those who suffer from this disease.”

    More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, according to the National Institute on Aging. Its incidence rises with age, affecting one in 10 Americans 65 and older, and one in three by age 85. Scientists are still trying to figure out what causes this progressive and irreversible brain disorder. But one prime suspect is beta-amyloid, a sticky protein fragment, or peptide, that accumulates in the brain, disrupting communication between brain cells called neurons. Much of this damage occurs, Ming says, when beta-amyloid attaches itself to metals such as iron or copper. These metals can cause beta-amyloid peptides to misfold and bind together in clumps that can promote inflammation and oxidation — a process similar to rusting — in nearby neurons, eventually killing them.

    Previous research conducted by other scientists suggests that beetroot juice can improve oxygen flow to the aging brain and possibly improve cognitive performance. Building on this work, Ming, Darrell Cole Cerrato and colleagues at the University of South Florida wanted to find out if betanin, a beet compound used in commercial dyes that readily binds to metals, could block the effects of copper on beta-amyloid and, in turn, prevent the misfolding of these peptides and the oxidation of neurons.

    In laboratory studies, the researchers conducted a series of experiments involving 3,5 di-tert-butylcatechol, or DTBC, a compound that is used as a model substance for tracking the chemistry of oxidation. Using visible spectrophotometry, the scientists measured the oxidative reaction of DTBC when exposed to beta-amyloid only, beta-amyloid bound to copper, and copper-bound beta-amyloid in a mixture containing betanin.

    “Our data suggest that betanin, a compound in beet extract, shows some promise as an inhibitor of certain chemical reactions in the brain that are involved in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Li-June Ming, Ph.D. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

    On its own, beta-amyloid caused little or no oxidation of DTBC. However, as expected, beta-amyloid bound to copper induced substantial DTBC oxidation. But when betanin was added to the copper-bound beta-amyloid mixture, the researchers found oxidation dropped by as much as 90 percent, suggesting that misfolding of the peptides was potentially suppressed.

    “We can’t say that betanin stops the misfolding completely, but we can say that it reduces oxidation,” Cerrato says. “Less oxidation could prevent misfolding to a certain degree, perhaps even to the point that it slows the aggregation of beta-amyloid peptides, which is believed to be the ultimate cause of Alzheimer’s.”

    About this neuroscience research article

    A press conference on this topic will be held Tuesday, March 20, at 9 a.m. Central time in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Reporters may check-in at the press center, Great Hall B, or watch live on YouTube http://bit.ly/ACSLive_NOLA. To ask questions online, sign in with a Google account.

    Funding: Ming acknowledges funding from the National Science Foundation.

    Source: Katie Cottingham – ACS
    Publisher: Organized by NeuroscienceNews.com.
    Image Source: NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.
    Original Research: The study will be presented at American Chemical Society 255th National Meeting.

    Cite This NeuroscienceNews.com Article

    ACS “Compound in Beets May Help Slow Alzheimer’s.” NeuroscienceNews. NeuroscienceNews, 20 March 2018.
    <http://neurosciencenews.com/beet-alzheimers-8670/>.

    ACS (2018, March 20). Compound in Beets May Help Slow Alzheimer’s. NeuroscienceNews. Retrieved March 20, 2018 from http://neurosciencenews.com/beet-alzheimers-8670/

    ACS “Compound in Beets May Help Slow Alzheimer’s.” http://neurosciencenews.com/beet-alzheimers-8670/ (accessed March 20, 2018).

    Feel free to share this ACS.

    Beets and Breasts

    These days, beets, in the form of genetically-modified sugar beets, are mostly known for their use in sugar production. But in their natural form, these colorful tubers have been used for hundreds of years (and the greens for thousands of years) for their natural health benefits. Some experts say that beets can be a great cancer preventative as well. Here are three reasons why!

    The Benefits of Beets

    #1. Beets are amazing blood purifiers. Beets can detoxify the blood and even promote molecular binding of toxins so they can be excreted out of the body. They also help to cleanse the liver; liver toxicity has been linked to cancer in numerous studies. Beets also contain organic nitrates. These nitrates are not bad for the body like artificial preservatives are, however. Once we consume them, they  convert to nitric oxide which helps circulation of blood and can even lower blood pressure. A large-scale study at King’s College in London found that hypertension significantly increases the risk of cancer for both men and women.

    #2. Beets contain cancer-fighting phytonutrients. Some of these nutrients are responsible for beets’ deep red color. Others, such as sulforaphane, are direct cancer-preventers. Sulforaphane is also found in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower. They are responsible for raising “Phase 2 enzymes,” which are powerful disease-preventers in the body. A 2013 animal study conducted at New York’s Howard University found that sulforaphane and other phytonutrients in beets can reduce tumor growth in pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines.

    #3. Finally, beets reduce inflammation. And if you don’t know it, then you should: inflammation is at the ROOT of almost all disease, including breast cancer! What makes beets such an inflammation-reducer is a phytonutrient called betaine. Betaine helps protect cells from oxidative stress that can happen through environmental exposure. With betaine in your side, you can boost your vascular system as well as lower inflammation.

    Dozens of Ways to Eat Beets

    Beets may be great for me, you may think, but how do I eat them?

    There are so many ways to enjoy beets! Raw beets can be shredded into salad. Sliced beets can be steamed or put into your fermented mixture along with cabbage and carrots for a tasty probiotic treat. You can buy them in this way at many natural health stores. You can make borscht, either the vegetarian or the meat version, for a hearty winter meal. And a refreshing drink that is catching hold in the U.S. is called beet kvass. This is a fermented elixir similar to kombucha that has been enjoyed for generations in Russia, where it originated.

    Beets are packed with nutritional goodness no matter how you prepare them. One thing to consider, however, is that beets are fairly high in natural sugar. If you are on a cancer-healing journey, be sure to monitor your blood sugar after eating them. Then you can gauge how many beets are a good balance for you.

    The post Beets and Breasts appeared first on NaturalNewsBlogs.

    7 Reasons to Love Beets

    Beetroot is rich in many nutrients and has a beneficial effect on . It can be very delicious and can be prepared in various ways (it can be eaten raw, roasted, boiled etc.)

    Lowers high blood pressure

    A recent survey by Queen Mary University concluded that one glass of beetroot juice a day can be more effective than medicines for blood pressure. This, of course, doesn’t mean you should stop taking the medication prescribed by your doctor. But it is not a bad idea to have more beets in the diet, because it may help in treating hypertension, angina pectoris and heart disease.

    Acts anti-inflammatory

    Raw beets and beet juice contains betaine, a natural anti-inflammatory agent that slows down aging and acts preventively against the diseases.

    Increases endurance in physical activity

    The study of English Exeter University found that consuming foods rich in natural nitrates, such as beetroot, improves exercise endurance. Scientists studied different substances and methods of training in order to discover what improves durability. Beet juice has proven to be most effective, improving durability by 16%. Natural nitrates dilate blood vessels and allow greater flow of oxygen to the heart.

    beet roots helps with blood pressure and may strengthen your immune system.

    Anticancer effects

    Phytonutrients include which give the characteristic red beet color, and are powerful ingredients that fight cancer. Beetroot is also rich in fiber, which also help protect against cancer. These fibers increase the body’s ability to detect and remove abnormal cells from the body before they become cancerous.

    Strengthens immunity

    Beetroot is rich in vitamin C, which strengthens the immune system.

    Reduces the risk for fetus problems

    Beetroot is rich in folate, vitamin B complex, which is recommended for pregnant women in order to reduce the risk of neurological disorders.

    It is rich in essential minerals

    Beetroot is rich in manganese and potassium. Manganese is needed because it helps body in maintaining healthy bones, liver, kidney and pancreas. Potassium helps maintain healthy nerve and muscle function.

    10 Ways to Cook With Beets – One Green PlanetOne Green Planet

    Beets can be kept in the fridge for a number of days and smaller sized beets can last in a plastic bag in the fridge for well over a week. Utilize a spiralizer to make pasta out of beetroot as in this Carrot Beet Angel Hair Pasta with Spicy Pine Nut and Pistachio Pesto and or a food processor for this Watermelon Gazpacho with Beet Noodles. Inspect out Here’s 3 Easy Ways to Make Vegan Ice Cream and use beets to make a gorgeous batch of beet ice cream.

    How sugar beets drew Latinos to Lansing

    How sugar beets drew some of the first Latinos to Lansing


    Ryan A. Huey for the Lansing State Journal

    Published 5:19 PM EST Nov 26, 2018
    Lansing Sugar Co.
    Courtesy of Capital Area District Library/Local History Photograph Collection

    Lalo Marinez Jr.’s dad used to tell him that trucking beets from farms to sugar factories was “the best part” of coming to Michigan.

    This was in the 1950s. The younger Marinez would have been 10 or 11 when he rode along with his father in a truck full of freshly picked beets ready to become table sugar.

    “He hauled beets in his truck all the time,” said Marinez, 78, a longtime Lansing resident who now lives in DeWitt. “That’s where he made his money . . . at least $10,000 a season hauling sugar beets, and, in those years, that’s a lot of money.”

    Sugar beets were big business here once and a business that changed the face of Lansing, the city’s north side in particular.

    Many of the first Spanish-speaking migrants to the area were betabeleros, workers recruited by sugar company agents to plant, tend and harvest beets.

    Lansing’s Spanish-speaking community first settled on the north side because the Michigan Sugar Co.’s Lansing Factory lay down the road.

    The number of Latinas and Latinos who migrated to work Michigan’s beet fields each season ballooned from roughly 5,000 in 1925 to 80,000 in 1968.

    Many stayed.  

    Lorenzo Lopez of Lansing holds portraits of his father, Eleuterio, left, and mother, Edelmira, on Monday, Nov. 19, 2018. Both were Mexican-American activists.
    Matthew Dae Smith/Lansing State Journal

    Betabeleros came from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Cuba along with other Central and South American nations, according to a 1983 study by the Chicano activist, educator and photographer Jesse Gonzalez.

    From the 1930s on, the majority came from Texas.

    Lorenzo Lopez’s parents, Delma and Eleuterio Lopez, left Texas in 1946  and “came to cold, wet Michigan to raise a family, to look for a job.”

    His parents would never work at the Michigan Sugar Co. plant, but, like many other Spanish-speaking migrants, they gravitated to the city’s north side, where “people had started renting accommodations not so far from the sugar beet factory,” he said. 

    Alfonso Salas holds the sign of what could be the future Cesar Chavez Ave. in 2002.
    LSJ file photo

    Last year, the Lansing City Council renamed a portion of Grand River Avenue that runs through the north end of the city after Mexican-American labor leader César Chávez, the long-time face of United Farm Workers, a union that advocated for migrant farm workers.

    To explain why Chávez’s efforts resonated so deeply with Lansing’s Latino community, and why leaders in that community focused their renaming efforts on the north side, you have to begin with beets.

    Sugar beets arrive in Michigan

    The “father of Michigan’s sugar beet industry” was Robert C. Kedzie, a chemistry professor at what was then Michigan Agricultural College.

    His scientific findings in the late 19th century helped adapt the crop to Michigan’s climate, and he lobbied state government on behalf of growers and investors to protect the fledgling industry.

    At the start, no one even knew if sugar beets would grow well enough in Michigan to be profitable. But Kedzie’s experiments convinced him they would, and that the jobs and capital they would bring could end Michigan’s dependence on imported cane sugar.

    R. C. Kedzie, “Father of the Sugar Industry in Michigan.”
    Courtesy of Archives of Michigan

    “The hope for a domestic supply for our people has been cherished in Michigan for years,” Kedzie told a congressional committee in the spring of 1900.

    At the time the Civil War broke out in April of 1861, most cane sugar in the U.S. was produced by enslaved laborers on plantations in Louisiana and Cuba. But once the war began, black sugar workers enslaved in Louisiana refused to work, broke machinery or simply left the brutal conditions of the sugar plantations.

    The abolition of slavery temporarily crippled the industry, but the planter elite gradually reestablished control over cane sugar production, first by importing raw sugar from Cuba, where plantation slavery still existed.

    When slavery was abolished in Cuba in 1886, seventeen American sugar refining companies combined to form the Sugar Refineries Co., aka the “Sugar Trust.” For decades to come, it would control nearly all cane sugar refineries in the U.S. and more than half of sugar production worldwide.

    Progressives decried that monopoly. Kedzie was one of them.

    A Nov. 7, 1898 letter from Robert C. Kedzie to F. R. Doughhurstm reading:
    “F. R. Doughhurst
    North Lansing
    Your sugar beet has been analyzed
    and given the following results
    Weight of beet 31 ounces
    Percent of Sugar 18.12
    Purity 90.6
    Beet of Excellent quality
    R. C. Kedzie”
    Ryan A. Huey / for the Lansing State Journal

    Kedzie had worked as a doctor in Kalamazoo and Vermontville before briefly serving as surgeon in the Civil War. He resigned from the military in October 1862 to take a teaching job in the chemistry department at M.A.C. and quickly became a favorite teacher and one of Michigan’s leading public health experts.

    Kedzie thought beet sugar made in Michigan was “our only way to escape the Sugar Trust” and its influence on the government.

    He persuaded M.A.C. to buy more than 1,700 pounds of beet seeds from Germany and France, varieties with names like Austrian Wokanka, Klein Wanzlebener and Vilmorin Imperial Improved.

    Under his direction, Kedzie boasted, “the College has sent out 5,300 pounds of sugar beet seed for the use of our farmers without cost to them. The College has thus planted the seed of a great industry in Michigan.”

    After the state legislature offered bounties for beet sugar of sufficient purity — a promise it would never fulfill — sugar factories sprouted up all over the state.

    Postcard depicting “Sugar Beet Factory, Lansing, Mich,” 1907. Printed by A. C. Bosselman & Co. Message reads, “There is no sugar m’f’rd [manufactured] here that is any sweeter than you… ‘sometimes’. What? Lovingly Mrs. K.”
    Courtesy of Archives of Michigan.

    The Michigan Sugar Co. of Bay City quickly became the most successful, organizing the Lansing Sugar Co. and ordering the construction of a factory north of the Grand River along what is now the north-south portion of Grand River Avenue in 1901.

    The factory was finished in time for the fall harvest. 

    The Owosso Sugar Co. bought the Lansing factory in 1903 and fixed it up to handle more volume.

    In 1912, one of its biggest seasons, the Lansing factory “sliced” close to 74,000 tons of beets and churned out 15,600,000 pounds of sugar.

    The company rarely struggled to find workers for the relatively well-paying factory jobs.

    Field labor was different.

    Beets become big business

    Owosso Sugar Factory, date unknown.
    Courtesy of Archives of Michigan.

    “Sugar beets demanded intensive hand labor,” wrote historian Dennis Valdés in his book “Al Norte: Agricultural Workers in the Great Lakes Region, 1917-1970,” and the work lasted “for much of the seven-month growing season.”

    Most farmers didn’t mind allocating land for the sugar companies’ beets, but few had the experience or workforce necessary to cultivate them on a large scale. It fell upon the sugar companies to recruit a workforce.

    Early on, women and children — especially immigrants from Belgium, Germany, Russia, Hungary, Poland, Serbia, Bohemia and other European countries with experience growing sugar beets — thinned and hoed beet fields for 50 to 60 cents a day, about half the minimum wage of adult male farm hands.

    Slovaks blocking and thinning beets near Corunna, Michigan, in 1917.
    Library of Congress / Lewis W. Hine

    American-born laborers from Detroit were sometimes shipped in, but they had a tendency to walk off the job.

    By 1906, a Lansing reform school called the Michigan Industrial School for Boys required pupils to grow beets, and, when necessary, the State Prison of Southern Michigan in Jackson shuttled convict laborers to work in the beet fields.

    Globally, the production of beet sugar overtook cane sugar in 1900 and was more profitable, too.

    Still, the success of Michigan beet sugar did little to upset the Sugar Trust’s monopoly. As early as 1902, the Sugar Trust started accruing stock in the Michigan Sugar Co. and encouraged it to absorb eight other factories in the state.

    In 1924, the Michigan Sugar Co. bought out the Owosso Sugar Co., bringing the massive Owosso factory and the more modest Lansing factory under the umbrella of the Sugar Trust.

    It brought capital, technological innovation and cost-cutting labor practices to the Lansing factory.

    It also brought seasonal workers from Texas and Mexico.

    Wives of sugar beet workers. Saginaw County, Michigan
    John Vachon / Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

    As early as 1915, the Michigan Sugar Co. sent recruiters south to bring Mexican and Tejano seasonal workers to Michigan.

    As immigration restrictions tightened after World War I, sugar beet industry representatives lobbied to maintain a porous border with Mexico, maintaining that they could not function without the betabeleros.

    “American boys will not work in the fields with their hands,” said Augustus C. Carton of the Michigan Department of Agriculture in 1925. “He will drive the tractor, but when it comes to getting down close to the ground and working with his hands on the plants, as work must be done with sugar beets, he will not do it.”

    Mexican and Tejano migrant workers were essential to Michigan’s agriculture, but sugar industry lobbyists rejected “a process whereby Mexicans would follow in the footsteps of European immigrants” in becoming landowners or permanent Michigan residents, historian Kathleen Mapes wrote in her book “Sweet Tyranny: Migrant Labor, Industrial Agriculture, and Imperial Politics.”

    Michigan state Rep. Roy Orchard Woodruff, a Bay City Republican, worried about what would happen if “these aliens come in under the guise of agricultural labor and are permitted to drift into our cities and compete with our skilled labor.”

    The sugar companies assured elected officials that “by nature the inherent traits of that race,” Mexicans preferred “outdoor life to the confinement of industrial pursuits.”

    Seasonal workers thinning beets, 1958.
    Farmers and Manufacturers Beet Sugar Association (Saginaw) / Courtesy of Archives of Michigan

    When the Great Depression hit Michigan in 1929, the sugar industry almost collapsed. The Lansing Factory closed.

    And immigrants became scapegoats, said Delia Fernandez, a professor of history at Michigan State University. Nationwide, during the decade of the depression, between 500,000 and a million people were repatriated to Mexico.

    “Mexicans and some Mexican Americans were targets,” she said.

    Michigan’s government approved a plan in 1932 to pay for the deportation of 5,000 beet workers, mostly on the east side of the state.

    The federal government organized the Immigration and Naturalization Service in 1933 to streamline deportation and repatriation efforts. A number of local police and welfare agencies didn’t wait for authorization from the agency to coerce Spanish-speaking people in the area to return to Mexico.

    A State Journal editorial in 1932 praised this repatriation effort as a “worthy plan” because it reduced “the welfare burden in communities of this state.” The newspaper applauded the beet sugar industry for hiring Michigan residents who “deserved preference in such work.”

    Housing for Mexican sugar beet workers. Saginaw Farms, Michigan
    John Vachon/Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

    Officials reported that federal and state agencies “repatriated about 3,500 Mexicans from the Michigan beet fields” in 1933, though the number was likely higher.

    This repatriation effort coincided with the reopening of Lansing’s sugar beet factory for the first time in several years. The Lansing welfare agency called upon “Belgians and Germans” who “understand beet culture” to apply for these jobs.

    A 1933 advertisement from the Farmers and Manufacturers Beet Sugar Association of Bay City promoted the rejuvenation of the state’s beet industry with an image of a blonde, fair-skinned child.

    “This splendid baby is a typical Michigan baby of a typical Michigan farm family,” the ad read.  “This family—like tens of thousands of other Michigan families—earns its living by growing and preparing your sugar beet crop.”

    But, even in the middle of the Depression in 1935, most white workers refused to work in the beet fields for the $1.40 a day that farmers typically paid migrant workers.

    Numerous beet growers complained that “American-born workers” were slower, sloppier, and “likely to quit.”

    “This is not a white man’s work,” rationalized Michigan Senator Miles M. Callaghan, a Reed City Republican, in 1937.

    If the beet industry were to survive, legislators realized, they needed to attract Mexican and Tejano migrant workers. They hoped to make their working conditions tolerable but also to keep them from staying year-round to avoid public outcry.

    In 1938, Michigan’s government revised the state codes governing beet field workers to raise the minimum wage, improve housing and end child labor. They authorized police to arrest truck drivers who transported migrant workers into Michigan without a permit. They allocated money to implement a mandatory health-screening program.

    In 1937, the Michigan Health Department had found that 25% of patients in tuberculosis hospitals were “Mexican beet workers.”

    In response, legislators called for a system of “concentration camps,” with Lansing as the central hub, that would force migrant workers to submit to medical screening before they could work.

    This idea was scrapped because of logistics. State officials instead sent doctors to Texas.

    They found that only 2% to 3% of the workers tested in 1940 and 1941 had contagious diseases, suggesting that the outbreak of disease was more likely related to the workers’ unsanitary living conditions in Michigan.

    Home of migrant workers in a sugar beet area of Saginaw County, Michigan
    John Vachon / Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)

    The meager living accommodations improved little through the 1960s.

    A 1968 report by the Michigan Civil Rights Commission found that “tens of thousands of field laborers” lived “in converted sheds, barns, chicken coops, and old schools and farmhouses” that were often haphazardly converted into houses.

    By that time, many Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Michigan had already left the fields for the factories.

    In the 1940s, “Mexican Americans were getting into industrial jobs more than they had ever before because of WWII,” said Delia Fernandez. “A lot of the people who were in Saginaw, my grandparents included, moved to Grand Rapids or to Detroit or to Lansing to work in one of the factories.”

    “Packaging Sugar,” Saginaw, Michigan, 1958.
    Farmers and Manufacturers Beet Sugar Association, Courtesy of Archives of Michigan.

    Lorenzo Lopez’s parents arrived in Lansing as Latinos were just starting to get more job opportunities outside of agriculture. Most hoped to land a year-round job in the auto factories, because the salaries and benefits were good enough for people to afford homes and permanently settle in Lansing.

    His father, Eleuterio, only worked a few months in agriculture before securing a job at General Motors’ Fisher Body Plant in Lansing, where he would work for 33 years.

    “That created a totally different life for him, for my mother, obviously for us,” he said.

    Wartime rubber shortages and gas rationing meant that fewer migrant workers risked driving across the country in gas guzzling trucks with no spare tires. For those who came, the war industries opened up opportunities to secure jobs in factories. Without enough field laborers, the sugar beet factory in Lansing was forced to close in 1943.

    Even with the factory closed, the Marinez family came to Lansing every summer from Crystal City, Texas, to work at Clyde Morrill’s farm in Clinton County.

    Born in Mexico, Lalo Sr. brought along his wife, children and two brothers, Efrain “Frank” and Teodoro, who also worked on local farms.

    At Morrill’s farm, Lalo Sr. cleared trees, tended to the cows, harvested wheat and distilled spearmint among other jobs. When the children were old enough, they would help.

    “The farm that we were at had sugar beets all the time,” Lalo Jr. recalls, so even with the Lansing factory closed, they could haul beets to the factory in St. Louis, just north of Alma.

    Unlike most migrant workers, Lalo Sr. owned a truck. He was able to transport workers from Texas to Michigan and shuttle them to and from the camps and fields during the season.

    By the late 1940s, beet harvesting was mechanized, so most agricultural workers were done with beets by October.

    Air ducts pump air through the beet piles to prevent rotting, in Saginaw, 1958.
    Farmers and Manufacturers Beet Sugar Association/Courtesy of Archives of Michigan.

    But Lalo Sr. drove to farms all over the area to “fill the truck with sugar beets and take them to Grand River Avenue,” Lalo Jr. recalls, “where that plant was.”

    When the Lansing factory closed for good in 1954, the St. Louis plant had already ceased operations for a couple years, so they took beets to another farm.

    “But it was really far away,” Lalo Jr. says, “so it wasn’t really profitable for my dad.”

    César E. Chávez Avenue

    As more and more Mexican American families settled in Lansing, mostly on the north side, they developed a stronger support system for the seasonal farmworkers who continued to come for sugar beets but also for crops like pickling cucumbers, cherries and spearmint.

    It was largely “word-of-mouth,” says Joe Garcia, executive director of the Cristo Rey Community Center. Mexican Americans in south Texas hoping to find farm work around Lansing were encouraged to “go to the north end of the town and drive through the neighborhoods until you see someone who looks like you.”

    The year-round residents, most of whom were bilingual, often knew which farmers were hiring and what the working conditions were like.

    “That’s how stuff got done,” says Garcia.

    That informal system of mutual aid was formalized in the Cristo Rey Community Center, built in 1966 at 1314 Ballard St. in north Lansing. The Center became vital for Spanish-speaking migrants to find housing, employment, and basic health care.

    César Chávez in Lansing in 1973. Delma Lopez is seated on the far left.
    Courtesy of Lorenzo Lopez

    Lansing’s Latino community leaders helped organize a statewide “March for Migrants” from Saginaw to Lansing in 1967 to improve working conditions for seasonal farm workers. César Chávez, the leader of the United Farm Workers, publicly backed the marchers and visited Lansing a week later to build support for the union’s boycott against grape growers.

    He visited Lansing many more times in the coming decades. Lopez’s mother, Delma, chaired the Cristo Rey Community Center’s board for 15 years and was often responsible for working out Chavez’s accommodations, including making sure he had vegetarian meals.

    “Lansing became a favorite stop (for him) because our families would practically run out of our houses to go see him,” Lopez said.  

    “That’s another reason why we wanted to make sure his street, César Chávez Avenue, was on the north side of Lansing.” 

    Mexican Americans increasingly understood themselves as a distinct ethnic group that faced unique forms of discrimination in American society. Many began studying and embracing their Mexican heritage, referring to themselves as Chicanos and Chicanas.

    Margarita Noyola holds a Cesar Chavez Avenue sign as she and others march down Kalamazoo Street to a rally to support the naming of the street to Cesar Chavez Avenue in 2002.
    LSJ file photo

    When a younger generation of Chicano activists came to MSU in the 1990s, they began demanding that the school and the community do more to acknowledge its Latino and Latina students.

    “It was hot,” recalls Paulo Gordillo, a student at MSU in the early 1990s. “Students were trying to get MSU to boycott grapes. They wanted a multicultural center built. They wanted a Chicano studies program established. There was a lot going on.”

    And they wanted to rename Grand Avenue after César Chávez.

    Gordillo spearheaded the effort in the fall of 1993, months after Chávez passed away.

    Lansing’s City Council approved the measure in 1994, but there was a strong backlash, and the name change was reversed by city referendum in 1995.

    Francesca Wodja, 16, from Lansing, holds a portrait of Cesar E. Chavez during a march and a celebration of naming part of Grand River Avenue and a plaza in Old Town after the civil rights hero who visited the area before he died.Photo by staff photographer Robert Killips
    Shoot Date:101610
    LSJ file photo

    Maria Enriquez, who joined the city’s Memorial Review Board around 2007, said she spent years “waiting for an opportunity to try and rectify the name changing back to Chávez.”

    She helped create the César E. Chávez Plaza in Old Town in 2010 and place honorary street signs for César E. Chávez Avenue along a section of Grand River Avenue from where it splits from Oakland Avenue to Pine Street.

    In October 2017, the City Council agreed to officially rename that portion César E. Chávez Avenue.

    “I saw a lot of commitment in people,” says Diana Rivera, who heads the César E. Chávez Collection at MSU Libraries. “They brought in facts. They brought in personal experiences. They brought in generational stories where grandparents and great-grandparents were part of that history.”

    “The contributions of a very significant community in the Lansing area were long overdue to be recognized,” she said. 

    The remains of this brick wall and the concrete slab outline of the footprint of the former Lansing Sugar Co. warehouse.
    Ryan A. Huey / for the Lansing State Journal

    Ryan A. Huey is a PhD candidate in the Michigan State University Department of History. Contact him at ryanahuey@gmail.com. Citations available on request. 

    Best Brain Foods: Greens & Beets Put to the Test

    Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

    The production in our brain of nitric oxide—the open-sesame molecule that dilates our blood vessels and is boosted by the consumption of nitrate-rich vegetables—and the role of nitric oxide in the control of nerve functioning “has been comprehensively investigated in [lab animals]. However, little evidence on [its] role” in human brain function existed…until it was put to the test.

    Feed people lots of green leafy vegetables with some beet juice to boot, and then measure cerebral blood flow. See that spot there with improved flow? That’s a critical brain area known to be involved in executive functioning. Okay, but improved blood flow doesn’t necessarily translate into improved cognitive function. For example, feed people tart cherries, and “despite some indication of improved blood flow,” this didn’t appear to manifest as improved cognitive performance.

    And indeed, some of the initial studies were disappointing. Give people over a cup of cooked spinach, and no immediate boost in the ability to carry out simple tasks. But, that may be because the tests weren’t hard enough. Give people a similar battery of simple tasks after consuming cocoa and no significant effect. But put people through a more demanding set of tasks, and you can see “acute improvements” in cognitive performance after cocoa consumption. The tasks they’re talking about are like counting “backwards in threes” for minutes at a time. What if you tried doing that same thing after drinking two cups of organic beet juice, which has about the same amount of nitrate as two cups of cooked arugula?

    Significantly improved performance, in terms of more correct answers on the sustained subtraction task. “These results suggest that a single dose of [nitrate-rich vegetables] can modify brain function, and that this is likely to be as a result of increased [nitric oxide] synthesis.” Okay, but how do we know it’s the nitrate? Beets are packed with all sorts of phytonutrients, like the betalain red pigment. One way to tease it out would be to come up with some kind of nitrate-depleted beet juice—has all the other stuff in beets, but just missing the nitrate—to see if that works just as well, and that’s exactly what researchers did.

    They developed a nitrate-depleted beetroot juice placebo. And, compared to that, within two weeks of supplementation with the real stuff, this group of diabetics got a “significant improvement in…reaction time.” Now we’re just talking 13 milliseconds here, but other interventions, like balance training, that only increased reaction time like seven milliseconds, were associated with significantly lower fall risk. And, of course, in athletes, those fractions of a second can sometimes make a difference.

    “At very high exercise intensities…, cognitive task performance deteriorates, with a pronounced detrimental effect on reaction time.” And, that may be just when you need it the most. You’re like playing football or something, and need to make rapid appropriate decisions while simultaneously going all out. And, once again, beets to the rescue: significantly reducing reaction time. So, not only improving physical performance, but mental performance as well.

    Yeah, but can it improve the structure of your brain? Things like cognitive training and aerobic exercise can actually affect the structure of the human brain. There’s something called neuroplasticity, where your brain can adapt, changing its configuration as you like learn to play piano or something.

    We used to think only younger brains could do this, but now we know it can occur in the aging brain as well. Can’t “beet” that—or can you? We didn’t know…until now. Here’s your brain before and after a six-week exercise program, measuring connectivity between various parts of your brain that control movement. No big change.  But, what about the same amount of exercise before… and after drinking some beet juice, too? Big difference. “The exercise plus [beetroot juice] group developed brain networks that more closely resembled those of younger adults, showing the potential enhanced neuroplasticity conferred by combining exercise and [nitrate-rich vegetables].”

    Please consider  to help out on the site.

    Below is an approximation of this video’s audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video.

    The production in our brain of nitric oxide—the open-sesame molecule that dilates our blood vessels and is boosted by the consumption of nitrate-rich vegetables—and the role of nitric oxide in the control of nerve functioning “has been comprehensively investigated in [lab animals]. However, little evidence on [its] role” in human brain function existed…until it was put to the test.

    Feed people lots of green leafy vegetables with some beet juice to boot, and then measure cerebral blood flow. See that spot there with improved flow? That’s a critical brain area known to be involved in executive functioning. Okay, but improved blood flow doesn’t necessarily translate into improved cognitive function. For example, feed people tart cherries, and “despite some indication of improved blood flow,” this didn’t appear to manifest as improved cognitive performance.

    And indeed, some of the initial studies were disappointing. Give people over a cup of cooked spinach, and no immediate boost in the ability to carry out simple tasks. But, that may be because the tests weren’t hard enough. Give people a similar battery of simple tasks after consuming cocoa and no significant effect. But put people through a more demanding set of tasks, and you can see “acute improvements” in cognitive performance after cocoa consumption. The tasks they’re talking about are like counting “backwards in threes” for minutes at a time. What if you tried doing that same thing after drinking two cups of organic beet juice, which has about the same amount of nitrate as two cups of cooked arugula?

    Significantly improved performance, in terms of more correct answers on the sustained subtraction task. “These results suggest that a single dose of [nitrate-rich vegetables] can modify brain function, and that this is likely to be as a result of increased [nitric oxide] synthesis.” Okay, but how do we know it’s the nitrate? Beets are packed with all sorts of phytonutrients, like the betalain red pigment. One way to tease it out would be to come up with some kind of nitrate-depleted beet juice—has all the other stuff in beets, but just missing the nitrate—to see if that works just as well, and that’s exactly what researchers did.

    They developed a nitrate-depleted beetroot juice placebo. And, compared to that, within two weeks of supplementation with the real stuff, this group of diabetics got a “significant improvement in…reaction time.” Now we’re just talking 13 milliseconds here, but other interventions, like balance training, that only increased reaction time like seven milliseconds, were associated with significantly lower fall risk. And, of course, in athletes, those fractions of a second can sometimes make a difference.

    “At very high exercise intensities…, cognitive task performance deteriorates, with a pronounced detrimental effect on reaction time.” And, that may be just when you need it the most. You’re like playing football or something, and need to make rapid appropriate decisions while simultaneously going all out. And, once again, beets to the rescue: significantly reducing reaction time. So, not only improving physical performance, but mental performance as well.

    Yeah, but can it improve the structure of your brain? Things like cognitive training and aerobic exercise can actually affect the structure of the human brain. There’s something called neuroplasticity, where your brain can adapt, changing its configuration as you like learn to play piano or something.

    We used to think only younger brains could do this, but now we know it can occur in the aging brain as well. Can’t “beet” that—or can you? We didn’t know…until now. Here’s your brain before and after a six-week exercise program, measuring connectivity between various parts of your brain that control movement. No big change.  But, what about the same amount of exercise before… and after drinking some beet juice, too? Big difference. “The exercise plus [beetroot juice] group developed brain networks that more closely resembled those of younger adults, showing the potential enhanced neuroplasticity conferred by combining exercise and [nitrate-rich vegetables].”

    Please consider  to help out on the site.